Single Use

Elastomer Stoppers: Working Toward Adopting an Industry-Wide User Requirements Specification for Particulate Levels

Two years ago, the companies involved in the BioPhorum Operations Group (BPOG) fill–finish community agreed that the quality of elastomer stoppers for vials was causing problems for biopharmaceutical manufacturers. So they deemed it to be a priority for the group. The problem is particularly pronounced for vial stoppers used in legacy products, which may have been on the market for several years. Many such medicines remain valuable for large patient populations. The stoppers used on legacy medicines are manufactured using…

The First Single-Use Diaphragm Valve: Automated and Controllable Systems Increase Process Reliability

Single-use components and systems now are firmly established in the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries. The trend toward simplified and flexible upstream and downstream plant design means that these components are becoming increasingly important — especially in biopharmaceutical production. In the past, the only available disposables were primarily tubes, fittings, and possibly filters. But the number of single-use systems has been increasing for a number of years now. It is hardly surprising that plant designers and operators now can rely on…

Design and Performance of Single-Use, Stirred-Tank Bioreactors

Single-use components and systems have been incorporated into many bioprocesses as an alternative to cleanable, reusable systems. A wide range of publications have detailed the reasons for this trend toward a single-use approach. Justification in many cases comes from process-specific benefits such as increased manufacturing flexibility — especially for contract manufacturing organizations (CMOs) — enhanced sterility assurance, elimination of cleaning, reduced capital investment, faster processing times with increased productivity, faster start-up, and other benefits (1). One critical factor in the…

Development of a High-Performance, Integrated, and Disposable Clarification Solution for Continuous Bioprocessing

Current bioprocesses combine fed-batch cell culture with batch-wise downstream processing steps. To achieve integrated upstream and downstream continuous manufacturing, the industry has been in need of a continuous cell separation and clarification solution for bioprocess fluids from bioreactors. The Cadence Acoustic Separator from Pall Life Sciences provides this solution, with continuous first-stage clarification without the need for filter media in a scalable, single-use format with no negative impact on product attributes. The Cadence Acoustic Separator delivers cost and time savings…

Center of Excellence

Enabling Continuous Processing Using a Step-by-Step Approach

Mario Philips is Vice President and General Manager of Single-Use Technologies at Pall Life Sciences. In February, he spoke with BPI publisher Brian Caine and editor in chief Anne Montgomery about Pall’s commitment to enabling continuous processing and its development of single-use technologies. In that discussion, he addressed some major process bottlenecks and Pall’s solution to them, including centrifuge replacements by continuous acoustic wave separation, continuous chromatography with multicolumn chromatography technology platform, and a simplified version of tangential-flow filtration. Read…

Flexible Automation for Continuous Unit Operations

Continuous processing has the potential to provide significant cost and time savings for biopharmaceutical manufacturing, but that potential can be realized only if appropriate automation solutions are available for continuous flow between disparate upstream and downstream operations. Pall Life Sciences’ Allegro MVP system, a fully automated bioprocessing system designed for use in upstream and downstream single-use processing, enables flexible automation and thus facilitates continuous biopharmaceutical manufacturing. This article presents the results obtained using the Allegro MVP system in combination with…

Bridging Polymer Science and Biotechnology Applications with Single-Use Technologies

Implementation of single-use technology in the biotechnology industry is increasing every year. One major interest has been understanding the interaction of extractables with protein and cells for applications ranging from cell banking to biopharmaceutical manufacturing. In October 2015, the Engineering Conference International (ECI) organization hosted a conference in Leesburg, VA, to explore how the science of plastic applies to bioprocessing. The “Single-Use Technologies: Bridging Polymer Science to Biotechnology Applications” meeting brought together experts from different fields to share issues, understanding,…

A Single-Use, Clinical-Scale Filling System: From Design to Delivery

Single-use components have been successfully incorporated into many unit operations for both upstream and downstream processing, from laboratory scale to commercial manufacturing. The development of single-use filling needles has created an opportunity to introduce fully disposable systems into final formulation and filling of drug products (1). One major challenge in replacing a cleanable filling line containing stainless steel needles is to ensure that an alternative system can satisfy all critical performance parameters established for an existing process. In 2012, Merck…

Single-Use Technology Enables Flexible Factories

The biosimilars market is rapidly evolving, with more than 450 biosimilar molecules in development worldwide, and many anticipated transfers of molecules in process around the globe. With US$85 billion of biopharmaceutical products coming off patent by 2020 (1), the driving force to develop biosimilars is strong. The market will be highly saturated, with dozens of biosimilars currently in development for each current blockbuster molecule. We know of 46 trastuzumab biosimilars and 39 rituximab biosimilars in development. Because the biosimilars market…

Outsourcing to Enhance Assurance of Supply: Application of Counterintuitive Supply Chain Strategies — A Case Study

Single-use technologies have transformed biopharmaceutical manufacturing by providing tremendous and proven opportunities to reduce costs, improve flexibility, and shorten cycle times. The expansion of such technologies into commercial production has naturally raised new challenges for both end users and suppliers, thus driving the need for a critical look at risks associated with their use. End users now face a new challenge: how to assess their own supply chains for robust assurance of supply. What is the suppliers’ responsibility in addressing…